Kalee Jones W.

kalee jones w. // august 13th

We are excited to have one of our in-store jewelry artists showing her many talents in the gallery. Kalee Jones W. brings a multidiscipline approach to her work with a focus in both sculptural stained glass and abstract style acrylic paintings. The many colors and textures seen in the glass bring inspiration for Kalee and she hopes to bring a closer connection between her sculptures and paintings as she continues to explore the two mediums.

Read more about the artist below.

Join us Thursday August 13th from 6-9pm for the Artist Preview Reception the evening preceding our regularly scheduled 2nd Friday Opening the following night during Live On The Plaza.

RSVP to the Facebook Event here.

Artist Preview Reception: August 13th 6pm-9pm
LIVE On The Plaza Opening: August 14th 7pm-11pm
Exhibit Runs August 13th – September 4th

Artist Questions
Where are you from?
Born in Texas, raised in Oklahoma and steeped in Colorado.  I now reside and create art in OKC.
How did you get started?
Five years ago, after moving back to Oklahoma, someone gave me a box of my mothers stained glass sheets.  I decided I wanted to give the art form a try. So I did and I liked it.
What inspires you?
Visual delight. I am drawn to glass for its many colors and textures as well as its ability to catch and cast light.
What is your medium/process?
I work with stained glass to create sculptural pieces, windows and jewelry. I am also a painter working in acrylics.
How would you describe your latest body of work?
This body of work is stained glass focused.  I have incorporated various found objects by encapsulating them in stained glass vessels.
What advice do you have to artists?
Create create create
What are your goals for the future?
A continued exploration of both stained glass and painting, bringing the two mediums closer together.

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ruth borum loveland

july 9th // ruth (borum) loveland

With summer in full swing DNA Galleries is happy to announce our latest art exhibition featuring Norman based artist Ruth (Borum) Loveland. As long time fans and close friends, we have had the great opportunity to see Ruth’s work progress and evolve over the last decade. Her newest series “demonstrates a slow accumulation of discoveries” which can be appreciated in the various media, use of color and meticulous detail-oriented subject matter. As each piece holds a level of personal meaning to the artist, she truly hopes that the viewer can interpret the works to find their sense of meaning.

Read more about the artist below.

Be sure to join us Thursday July 9th from 6-9pm for the Artist Preview Reception the evening preceding our regularly scheduled 2nd Friday Opening the following night during Live On The Plaza.

RSVP to the Facebook Event here.

Artist Preview Reception: July 9th 6pm-9pm
LIVE On The Plaza Opening: July 10th 7pm-11pm
Exhibit Runs July 9th – August 7th

ruth borum loveland

Artist Questions // Ruth (Borum) Loveland

Where are you from?

I am from Oklahoma City

How did you get started?

I made a conscious shift in the way that I used my free time when I was like… 15. I’ve been painting regularly ever since.

What inspires you?

I am inspired by art materials, wood grain, being outdoors, mushrooms, things my son says, things I feel, things I know to be true.

What is your medium/process?
I consider all my work as mixed media. It is a combination of pen drawings, photocopied manipulations of pen drawings, transfers of those manipulations, wood-burnings, sanded layers of paint, and acrylic paint applications. I work in a series, so I usually begin a piece where another one left off and the outcome
Is always unplanned.

How would you describe your latest body of work?
My latest body of work demonstrates a slow accumulation of discoveries. It’s centered around the process I have developed around taking an original drawing and manipulating it on a copy machine. When enlarging images, I stay pure to the photocopier, and never scan or digitally alter an image. The stretching that occurs in some of the forms is a movement on the glass of the copier, thus making each output truly original and impacted by the touch of a hand. I love the surprise of taking a drawing and altering it with movement on the copy machine. My recent body of work explores bringing these techniques together, taking me further in my image making journey. My husband went through an intensive course of cancer treatment last year and I find that everything I do now is a meditation of gratitude, community, love, relationships, and repeating, altering, and multiplying the good in our lives. While some of the work carries personal meaning, my greatest wish is that it can be open to the the viewer for their personal interpretation. Each painting can be appreciated for the basic material aspects of color, shape, size, and level of detail. I keep a certain level of feeling and understanding hidden just below the surface of the formal aspects of the work as to allow it to be hung in any space and be an object of interest and consideration.

What advice do you have for other artists?
Work on something everyday. Even if it seems inconvenient. Habit is more dependable than inspiration or talent.

What are your goals for the future?
Since having my son, I have had to completely rewire my ways of working and am just now gathering my steam back up. I ended up in a full time job, that is really great but includes a commute, so I have to work double hard to carve out time to work in the studio. My goal is to transition back into full time art making through gallery representation and direct work with folks to make art for their homes. I just bought a potters wheel and a tiny kiln so a big goal is to get a regular ceramics practice going. I also want to do more west coast traveling with my husband and son in the future. We go out into the woods around Oklahoma a lot and I want to continue to do more of that.

ruth borum loveland


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Klair Larason

june 11th // klair larason

For June at DNA Galleries we are changing things up a little with an Artist Preview Reception: Thursday, June 11th from 6-9pm, preceding our regularly scheduled 2nd Friday Opening the following night during Live On The Plaza.

Join us as artist Klair Larason displays new works filled with a mixture of vibrant colors, fluid shapes and textures from both manmade and natural origin. Using her personally developed foil gum wrapper gilding process, each piece relates to “individual experiences” from the artist’s life from the last 2 years. The concept behind each piece is explored with the use of skulls, bones and 2-d surfaces as support structures for the gum wrapper medium. A playful palette of colors flow in an almost liquid state over the visually raw elements of the skull and bone based pieces, creating a sense of contrast and layered meaning. To accompany this series, Klair has produced a series of skateboard decks which contain patterns made up of select pieces from the show.

RSVP to the Facebook Invite here.

Artist Preview Reception: June 11th 6pm-9pm
LIVE On The Plaza Opening: June 12th 7pm-11pm
Exhibit Runs June 11th – July 3rd

Klair Larason

Artist Questions // Klair Larason

What is your medium/process?
I use the foil from colored gum wrappers. They’re my primary medium and I support my work with bones, skulls, or design on a 2-d format. The process is close to gilding, however my technique differs from professional gild-work as I don’t use artist quality material. For my sculpture, I melt polymer over whatever I’m going to be working on, then peel foil off the wrappers, and adhere it to the areas I want to cover on my work. When choosing my skulls and subject matter, I look for things that interest me, or allow me to express a feeling I’ve experienced recently.

Where are you from?
I’m from Oklahoma City! I was born here, and I’ve lived here forever. I travel to New Mexico quite a bit too, so I also feel comfortable when I’m on the mesa and in the mountains. I’m fortunate to be able to call both places home.

How would you describe your latest body of work?
I would describe each piece as a series of individual experiences I’ve had in the last two years. Some of those experiences are great and happy, while others are the lowest I’ve felt in my life. I think the use of color speaks most about each piece. Even though my medium has only 14-16 choices of colour, I like to experiment with the combinations to create my perception about my memories. The artificial restriction of a small palette gives me more limitations, and I like that. I think it helps me to push back harder against those adversities, within my art and outside of my control in the larger world.

What inspires you?
Oh gosh, other art and music for sure. I’ll get hooked on one artist for maybe a month, then move on, but I always remember what I’ve seen. Right now I’ve enjoyed work from Sarah Cain and Chris Ware. Juxtapoz had fantastic interviews from them both featured in this year’s May issue, and I’ve kept it close since it arrived in the mail. I’ve also been drunk on Mac Demarco, Connan Mockasin, and Corners. I can’t figure out how to listen to any other music right now. And lastly, my friends who also make art rub off on me too. I like to see what they’re doing, because most of the time what they make is really cool.

How did you get started?
I always remember when I was little, about times when I would just like to create something, either building a box fort or trying to write my own stories. I was twelve, and during a spell of boredom I tried to peel foil off a gum wrapper, like a friend showed me how to do at school. I started to cover a skateboard, and that alone took a year to do, but after a while I got more skilled at it, and started doing other small things. After a while, working became an escape for me, and I just kept going. It probably all came about because was a really lonely, weird kid.

What are your goals for the future?
I’m in a slight lull right now, taking things easy, saving up, and making things I haven’t had time for until now. Starting on some really big work, stuff that can’t be made at a desk. Things like that. I’m working on becoming a more professional artist and not be so spotty with everything. It’s really hard, but I hope it pays off.

Special Thanks
I’d like to thank everyone at DNA Galleries, Dylan and Amanda Bradway, Stacey Miller and Tony Morton, the good folks at Core Extreme Sports, Charlie Trujillo at Lettering Express, Kaiser Volk, Karen Collier, Garrett Young, and my parents for all the help with this show. Without you guys, I’d be a mess.


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Jetpacks & Jasmine

meet your maker // jetpacks & jasmine

Meet Your Maker for the month of June, Tamara Shryock.  She is a lady of many talents.  She hand crafts some of our most fun items in store.  From flower crowns, to felt magnets & pillows and our personal favorite.. Plushidermy wall mounts.  Her colorful creativity is inspired by pop culture, TV shows and movies.  Her IG says she’s probably one of the most boring people you’ll ever meet.  We say the opposite.  Tamara’s energy could inspire anyone to start crafting ASAP!  She is a blast to be around.  Her products definitely embody her personality.  We are so thankful for the opportunity to carry Tamara’s lively creations in our store.

 

Jetpacks & Jasmine

What is your process?
Think about it, make it, take it apart, make it again, cut it, sew it, start over, and victory!

Where are you from?
South Side OKC

What inspires you?
Mainly pop culture, movies and TV shows that I love. I always try to create things that I would want to buy. I spend a fair amount of time on Instagram looking at all the random photos and am inspired by a large number of different artists.

How did you get started?
I started off with photography, I did mainly pinup photography and got a calendar I made in Blue 7 from there it has snowballed into hand sewn finger puppet sets to the variety of items I currently make.

How old were you when you started selling your handmade items locally?
I want to say early twenties.

What are your goals for the future?
To dominate my markets and add new stores outside of the OKC market.

Jetpacks & Jasmine

How much time a week do you spend with your craft?
Crafting is my full time job now so definitely over 40 hrs, I work 7 days a week but take more than an hour lunch :)

Any advice for other crafters or those looking to become makers in the future?
Don’t stop! When you find that one thing you’re really good at keep at it! Keep trying different methods or crafts until you find the thing you are good at. So many people give up. Don’t ever give up!

IMG_6575

What do you do in your spare time?
Aqua Zumba, turning into a cat lady and obsessing over Disneyland.

What tunes can you not stop listening to?
I made this sweet 90s pop station on Pandora that I kick out all my jams to when I’m fitnessing.

Jetpacks & Jasmine


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Cassie-ChickenShit

Natalie Kent GEM2

may 8 // cassie stover + natalie kent

We have two female artists in the gallery for May. Cassie Stover has created a series of 8″x10″ paintings inspired by animals with comedic and human qualities while adding a bit of her own humor. Natalie Kent’s work is comprised of various forms of symbolism and dream imagery which is meant to spark a question in the viewer and leave the meaning behind the work up to interpretation.

 You can RSVP to the Facebook Event here.

Artist Questions

Cassie Stover Lost In The City

Cassie Stover

What is your medium/process?
Acrylic on canvas.Where are you from?
Oklahoma City, OK

How would you describe your latest body of work?

After realizing how often I post animal photos on my Instagram, I thought to myself, why am I drawn to them and what do they all have in common?  I discerned that they were mostly comedic and took on some form of personification.  As humans, it’s pretty fun to see ourselves in other creatures.  So I made a conscious effort to paint animals versus humans and insert a bit of my own humor.

In the past I have worked primarily on large scale pieces.  This time around, I decided to restrict myself to an 8×10 format, which offers up it’s own challenges and rewards. Large scale paintings just have that immediate impact, the size alone draws in viewers. Yet working with the 8×10’s I have found they feel more intimate, and I can be as bold with color as I please.

Overall, my work has underlying narrative qualities, but only snippets. I want to know where this monkey is going, and why is he lost in the city? Hopefully they viewer will finish the story for his or herself.  That’s the fun part. Or at the very least be amused.

How did you get started?
I’ve always been an artist, since I could hold a crayon I suppose.  I’ve been one of the lucky ones, with a family that encouraged and supported me from childhood to adulthood to pursue the arts.

What are your goals for the future?
Stay motivated.

Natalie Kent The Sage

Natalie Kent

What is your medium/process?
I work in a variety of mediums ranging from graphite pencil, pen and ink, or Prismacolor pencil to large acrylic paintings. Lately I’ve enjoyed focusing on small drawings and illustrations.

Where are you from?
Houston, Texas, living and working in Edmond.

How would you describe your latest body of work?
This latest body of my work relies heavily on symbolism and dream imagery. I enjoyed creating these pieces with a lot of unanswered questions so that- like dreams- the meaning may vary from viewer to viewer. I think one of the most powerful elements in art is the power of interpretation. Good art doesn’t just give you the answer, it lets you find it on your own.

What inspires you?
Dreams, metaphors, Renaissance & Surrealist art, and nature. I’d say 99% of my work usually falls in one of those categories. I bring my sketchbook everywhere I go and it’s filled with notes of last night’s dreams, doodles, urban sketches, ideas for future paintings… we live in an amazing world full of the most fascinating things. It’s hard not to be inspired.

How did you get started?
I began creating art when I was very young. Some kids would sell lemonade in the neighborhood and I would sell art for 5 cents, setting up shop on a little table at the end of my driveway and busting out one-of-a-kind Picasso-esque Crayola marker pieces. My parents were very supportive of my interest in art and enrolled me in oil painting and watercolor classes throughout middle school and high school.

What are your goals for the future?
My goals for the near future are to transition into developing larger paintings. Working on a large scale is out of my comfort zone and honestly a bit intimidating for me, but as an artist I think it’s imperative to challenge yourself and push your limits on a semi-regular basis to improve yourself. There’s no growth in the comfort zone.

As far as long-term goals, I plan on continuing to create art and show my work in Oklahoma City.


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The Little Bubble

meet your maker // the little bubble

Our May Meet Your Maker is the one and only Bella Corrente of “The Little Bubble” –  Bella is the brain behind the fun and magic that is put into each and every bar of soap she makes.  She is 11 years old this year and she started making soaps at 9 years old.  Since that time, her business has grown tremendously.  Bella and her mother, Tawyna, set up at H&8th, Industry Flea, Deluxe Winter Market and stay busy in between shows with her booming Etsy shop.  All the while, they keep our store stocked with tons of smell goods.  People often pop in the door and ask “Where are the Little Bubble soaps?”  We are pleased to share a little bit more about Bella with you.  She is an inspiration to all around her. We are so proud of you, girl!! Keep doing your thing.

The Little Bubble

Meet Your Maker Questionnaire

Bella Corrente // The Little Bubble

What is your process?
I find the fragrance I like first then I think about colors & designs… next I have to decide on the ingedients, everything is made with different stuff.

Where are you from?
Oklahoma City

What inspires you?
Sometimes I can watch a movie or hear a song and know that I want to make a soap that goes with that! Or I can see a fabric or pattern that I like…

How did you get started?
I started making soap and scrubs as a homeschool project! It helped me learn about fractions and measuring, & science! And I just loved doing so I kept making!

How old were you when you started selling your handmade items locally?
I sold my soap when I was 9 at Wiggle Out Loud

What are your goals for the future?
I want to be a photographer or work for Vogue and I want to have my own soap shop.

How much time a week do you spend with your craft?
I spend about 3 hours a day filling orders and making stuff.

Any advice for other crafters or those looking to become makers in the future?
First you have to have guts… and not be afraid of other people and putting your stuff out there.  And you need to learn as much as you can about your craft… research a lot.  What ever you want to make or do just try it! Because you won’t know if you like it or good at it if you don’t try!

What do you do in your spare time?
I love to sculpt! I make polymer clay donuts, & ice cream cones and other food things for jewlery! & I like to draw food with funny faces

What music are you currently listening to?
I love Welcome Little Stranger & David Bowie… and Mumford and Sons and Johnny Cash… but I listen to lots of other stuff too! I love my record player!

The Little Bubble


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Amber Black

Lauren Miller

april 10 // amber rae black + lauren miller

This month’s 2nd Friday features the improbably elaborate drawings of local artists Amber Rae Black and Lauren Miller. We particularly enjoy the way the individual artist’s themes of duality intertwine with the similar use of materials to directly compliment one other. Amber’s work portrays hauntingly hopeful depictions of “life and growth out of pain and loss”. Lauren Miller’s latest series of graphite portraits on birch panel is similarly themed in it’s emphasis on “freedom from deeply rooted lies” and putting faith in the unseen.

RSVP for the Facebook Event here.

ARTIST QUESTIONS

Amber Black

AMBER RAE BLACK

What is your medium/process?
I like working in mixed mediums but I usually start with drawing. Drawing is my home. In general, I am in love with a tactile process and being swept up in that moment when the work just flows.

Where are you from?
I was born and raised in Oklahoma.

How would you describe your latest body of work?
All of my current work has, in some way, been inspired by the sudden death of a young loved one and the witnessing of her passing. It began as catharsis and is intended to express both the moment of death and also the exquisite pain that transforms and awakens those left to mourn that loss. I hope the pieces communicate a life and growth that is born out of pain and loss.

What inspires you?
Memories, dreams, personal experiences. I am inspired, in the most part, by personal experiences and tend to work somewhat autobiographically. My art is often an attempt to hold onto or relive a moment or feeling.

How did you get started?
I always made art as a kid and felt most like myself when making art. My parents and grandparents also always encouraged me to keep going. I just never stopped.

What are your goals for the future?
I just want to keep making art and to get better at it. I would also possibly like to do some form of art therapy with children or women someday.

Artists Statement:
The body of work ‘Bright Crossing’ was inspired by the sudden death of a young loved one and the witnessing of her passing. The work began as catharsis and continued out of a desire to linger in the threshold between life and the moment of death. The mixture of mediums is meant to draw a contrast between the frailty of ephemeral flesh and the bright intangibility of the spiritual. The colors symbolize the spirit but also the life and growth that is born out of pain and loss. The work is intended to express both the moment of a souls departure and also the exquisite pain that transforms and awakens those left to mourn that loss.

 

Lauren Miller

LAUREN MILLER

What is your medium/process?
Graphite and acrylic paint on birch panels.

Where are you from?
Oklahoma City

How would you describe your latest body of work?
My collection is about finding freedom from deeply rooted lies I’ve believed and what it is to place my hope in the unseen God who I’ve given my life to.

What inspires you?
The beauty that comes with struggle.

How did you get started?
I’ve been creating most of my life.

What are your goals for the future?
To continue to dig deeper and create art that inspires and moves.

 


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OKC Lindsay Harkness

meet your maker // lindsay harkness

April’s Meet Your Maker is local photographer Lindsay Harkness.  Lindsay is a lifelong resident of OKC.  She is incredibly passionate about Oklahoma and capturing the history of our state and changes to local buildings.  Lindsay says “The nostalgia of my images often overwhelms people as they reminiscence about favorite memories.  It makes me happy to know i have captured images that are sentimental to my fellow Oklahomans.”

PlazaDistrict - Lindsay Harkness

Meet Your Maker Questionnaire

What is your process?
I am a photographer. I use a process of sandpaper, paint, glue and water on my photographs to achieve my aesthetic.

Where are you from?
I am born and raised in Oklahoma. I graduated from Edmond Santa Fe in 2000 and The University of Oklahoma School of Art in 2004.

What inspires you?
Doing something that no one else can do the exact same way inspires me. Creating something that puts a smile on someone’s face inspires me.  I got my start on my Oklahoma Landmark Series with a challenge from an out of stater. He claimed there was nothing special about Oklahoma, nothing that we should be proud of.  He was just a customer, but his one off the cuff statement challenged me to prove him wrong, and I feel pretty confident that I’m doing a good job!

How did you get started?
My parents gave me a camera for my high school graduation gift. Going into college I had no idea what I wanted to be when I grew up, but I knew I loved my high school photography classes and I had a new camera….Art school here I come. As for my mixed media process it has been a long line of mistakes that I had to find solutions for. I’ve have found that a mistake is often times the universe telling you to look or approach the original concept differently.  So many good things have come from me saying, “Oh shit, what do I do now”, that I embrace the challenge to think different.

How old were you when you started selling your handmade items locally?
2004ish….I can’t remember if I sold stuff at the original Blue 7 and then made it into the second Girlie Show, or if because I was in The Girlie Show I was chosen to sell stuff at Blue 7. Either way let’s say 22.

What are your goals for the future?
A dream come true would be :  I would have a studio with a dark room.  My photographs would be in such high demand that I would never run out of work or money.  For reality purposes I would love to continue my photographic journey of my Oklahoma Landmark Series and expand beyond just the OKC metro area.  And if I play my cards right pick up the title of Oklahoma Souvenir Connoisseur.

How much time a week do you spend with your craft?
That varies on my other job.  I am photo assistant as well and travel with a photographer all over the country.  Each week is different and more often then not I take my supplies with me on the road and work in hotel rooms.  Any free time I have I am sanding away.

Any advice for other crafters or those looking to become makers in the future?
I would say make sure you love doing what you do.  Chances are especially at the beginning you will have to work another job to support your craft.  There’s never a day off, you will always feel like you should be doing something, and most of your money you make will have to go back into your business. All that said you are your own boss, if you want to work until 3am and wake up at noon you can.  Making stuff and seeing others enjoy it is an amazing feeling. I’ve been working on this Oklahoma Landmark Series for almost 10 years now and I still never tire from hearing stories of what the buildings mean to them, or how excited they are to send one of the images to a loved one who no longer lives here.

What do you do in your spare time?
What is spare time?  Just kidding….when I do finally decide to take a break I love being with my friends.

What is your favorite place to grab a coffee?
I’m not really a coffee drinker, but I do love a good patio and a glass of wine.

What music currently inspires you?
Music..hmmm I have a mix on my pandora that ranges from the 60’s, 70’s, & 80’s to Enya to Warren G. I’m not too picky but I do know that heavy metal makes my brain and body shut down.

MilkBottle


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happy happy

march 13 // nicole moan: hunting down my childhood

In this new series Nicole Moan documents many of the creative 2 dimensional characters that inhabited her youth by building them into 3 dimensional clay sculptures. The idea for this series struck her as she watched her kids watch “new” television shows and realized how much of it now overlaps with shows of her youth. Nicole decided to take a trip down memory lane and bring these characters to life in a way that is both humorous and original.

Come out to the opening Friday March 13th from 7-11pm at DNA Galleries.

Make sure to RSVP to the Facebook Event here.

fire fire

Artist Questionnaire

What is your medium/process?
My medium is mostly clay but I love working with so many. I make all of the skirts that go with my ceramic corsets. I also create jewelry and accessories of mixed mediums. As far as process goes, when I get an idea for a creation I turn it over in my head for a while until I can see how it can be made before I attempt to bring it to life.

Where are you from?
I’ve spent all of my adult life living in Oklahoma City, with the exception of a brief stint in Lancaster, California, but I spent most of my childhood moving around the country with my artist parents.

How would you describe your latest body of work?
Lately I have been very inspired by cartoons and characters from my childhood. The characters themselves are fairly self-explanatory. Placing their heads on plaques as trophies is that feeling of wanting to keep that youthful place and preserve it as a hunter would. They are the memories that framed my youth. Not just MY youth, several generations of youths. As we grow older, we all search for ways to hold on to our feelings of being young. I think this is something most everyone can identify with.

What inspires you?
The thing that inspires me the most is developing and learning new techniques. Finding something that no one is doing and building on it.

How did you get started?
Both of my parents are artists, so I grew up around a lot of creativity. Both were painters but they also owned a business creating and sculpting props for businesses. I had the opportunity to see and learn many techniques as well as learning to think about projects in engineering terms as well. This still influences almost every aspect of my work.

What are your goals for the future?
My current goals are to have a space for teaching ceramic techniques that other places don’t give lessons in, as well as to bring in other artist to host and teach other types of work. I would love to see my work carried in galleries all over the country, and my corsets on runways in the major fashion cities.


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William R. Struby - Mandala

feb 13 // william r. struby + claire deveney

William R. Struby uses digitally created mandalas mixed with hand cut digital images. Inspired in his own words by “imagined stories and encountered mysteries.” His latest works Mandalas and Mysteries attempt to represent “a fuller consciousness—the circle of interconnected life and death.”

Claire Deveney is our special neighbor friend who works just next door. Upon meeting her in person doing public art, we stumbled across her incredible metal works not long after on social media. These pieces are 3-d representations of her 2-d characters and have to be seen in person. Each character changes it’s features as the piece moves freely on a wire and alternately casts these outlines on surrounding surfaces.

You can RSVP to the Facebook Event here.

Claire Deveney


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  • ABOUT US

    DNA Galleries is an artist made store and urban contemporary art gallery in Oklahoma City. We are located in the historic Plaza district at 1709 NW 16th OKC, OK 73106

    Click Here for Map
    Hours:
    Mon-Tue: 11am-7pm
    Wed-Sat: 11am-8pm
    Sun: 11am-5pm

    Phone: 405.525.3499

  • 2015 Art Calendar