illustration

july 7 // dylan bradway

Dylan Bradway - Warming Up

Join us the evening of July 7 for the opening night of our newest exhibition featuring the work of Dylan Bradway.

This exhibition will be in part a retrospection featuring works, largely unseen, created over a span of eight years. This show will also include many new pieces created in 2016.

ARTIST RECEPTION Thursday, July 7th // 6-9pm
LIVE ON THE PLAZA Friday, July 8th // 7-11pm
Exhibit runs July 7th - August 7th

Dylan Bradway - Blue Flower

march 10 // annavittoria conner, boo boo danger + pearl olsen

Annavittoria Conner

For our March gallery opening we have teamed up with Ross Adams to bring punk to the Plaza District for Everything is not o.k. II "how do you put a price on garbage?" This 4 day event will be filled with art, punk and fun. DNA will host 3 artists on our walls with a wild mix of illustration and screen printing.

Annavittoria Conner brings her take on "fourth wave feminism" to the show through her printmaking techniques. Armors, a series of illustration by Boo Boo Danger, hope to expose past identities and hidden truths seen in the adornments of punk torsos. Pearl Olsen focuses her energy on sumi inks on kozo paper for a series of "Illustrations for a story about escape and survival."

Join us Thursday March 10th from 6-9pm for the Artist Preview Reception the evening preceding our regularly scheduled 2nd Friday Opening the following night during Live On The Plaza from 7-11pm. Don't miss the poetry reading by: Joseph Sulier on Saturday afternoon.

Artist Preview Reception: March 10th // 6pm-9pm
LIVE On The Plaza Opening: March 11th // 7pm-11pm
Exhibit Runs March 10th - April 1st

Pearl Olsen
Pearl Olsen

ARTISTS QUESTIONS

Annavittoria Conner
What is your medium/process?
Screen printing, intaglio, relief, digital printmaking, fibers, and now I’m getting into ceramics.

Where are you from?
Denton, Texas. An amazing place to be from creativity wise. I went to The University of North Texas there and I wouldn’t trade that for anything. The print program was worth every penny.

How would you describe your latest body of work?
Slutty, sexy, and goofy. I’m trying to figure out fourth wave feminism along with a lot of other contemporary creatives. I like to talk about prostitution, sex, gender roles, trans-sexuality, amongst many other issues.

What inspires you?
Women. I embrace all kinds of women but I’m mostly inspired by the outcasts and underdogs. Visually I’m inspired by other artists but conceptually I’m inspired by personal accounts and various books that deal with these issues. Of course music and film plays a role in my art as well. After I watched Tangerine I drew for days, after I read Playing the Whore I created my latest print.

How did you get started?
I’ve always made art, even as a child but I didn’t get into printmaking until one of my best friends, Josh Banks, suggested it to me. He is an amazing printmaker and musician and after he suggested my work would translate well within the medium I took the ball and ran with it.  

What are your goals for the future?
I have two more years of grad school at OU and my biggest goal at the moment is to find my voice as a graduate student and make my professors proud.

What advice do you have to artists?
Support the art world. Buy zines, prints, shirts, anything you can afford! Support the arts, go to openings and make friends within the art community. If you don’t support others how can you ask for support yourself?

Boo Boo Danger
What is your medium/process?
I typically work with pen and ink on paper or digital depending on the project. For this body of work I chose ink and gauche on bristol.

Where are you from?
Originally I’m from Boston but I’ve been living in Oakland, CA for seven years.

How would you describe your latest body of work?
Armors is a portrait series in a sense. As a young punk my friends and I used our jackets and vests to create our identities. Band names, slogans, political affiliations. As an adult I look back on those jackets and I think about the things that I was hiding from the world and myself. Armors is about exposure.

What inspires you?
I try to keep myself open to inspiration at all times. Cities, books, comics, movies, other artists. There is also a constant dialogue running in my head outside of my own influence and sometimes I need to draw out the ideas presented there to visualize and understand them.

How did you get started?
When I was 12 or 13 I got a spiral-bound sketch book and started trying to recreate graffiti I saw in my neighborhood; ads I liked in Thrasher and Propaganda magazines; and record covers by Pushed, Raymond Pettibon, and Mad Marc Rude. Soon I was spray painting around town and making art for my own bands.

What are your goals for the future?
Make more stuff. Do more stuff. I’ve got a lot of irons in a lot of fires right now but there is always room for more.

What advice do you have to artists?
The more you do the easier it gets. Make zines, stickers, buttons, flyers, greeting cards, whatever. Make stuff that you like; someone else is bound to like it too.

 

Pearl Olsen
What is your medium/process?

Right now all I do is draw with sumi brushes and ink, or sometimes watercolor, mainly on translucent kozo paper, because I received the brushes and paper as gifts and so I'm working my way through them until I run out and am forced to spend money on more supplies. I used to draw with pens but they were too familiar and made me too obsessive. Using the long brushes instead of pens helps me move quickly and work with whatever happens on the page. I set up my workspace so I could draw with natural light during the day but I always end up making pieces at 10 or 11 at night under a desk lamp.

Where are you from?
I grew up in Tulsa, Oklahoma and I've been living in Saint Louis, Missouri for 6 years.

How would you describe your latest body of work?
Illustrations for a story about escape and survival.

What inspires you?
People around me who trust themselves without egotism. Things that are just trying to manifest and exist on the margins.

How did you get started?
I practiced drawing constantly while I was growing up, then abandoned it at age 17 when I failed my Advanced Placement art test, then picked it up again in 2014 when people started asking me to do illustrations for zines and flyers for punk shows.

What are your goals for the future?
To work less hours so I can sit around doing nothing more and produce the same amount of work, but the work will be better.

What advice do you have to artists?
Don't be afraid of: idleness, time spent repulsed by art-making, long periods of dullness. These are a part of making things just as much as the active production of work. I consider my 8-year hiatus from drawing to be the most important element to my current work. Things made when identifying strongly as an "artist" will almost always suck. Trust peripheral vision more than trained focus. Don't go to art school or listen to advice from people who did unless it is "don't go to art school."

cassie stover + natalie kent

Cassie-ChickenShit Natalie Kent GEM2

may 8 // cassie stover + natalie kent

We have two female artists in the gallery for May. Cassie Stover has created a series of 8"x10" paintings inspired by animals with comedic and human qualities while adding a bit of her own humor. Natalie Kent's work is comprised of various forms of symbolism and dream imagery which is meant to spark a question in the viewer and leave the meaning behind the work up to interpretation.

 You can RSVP to the Facebook Event here.

Artist Questions

Cassie Stover Lost In The City

Cassie Stover

What is your medium/process? Acrylic on canvas.Where are you from? Oklahoma City, OK

How would you describe your latest body of work?

After realizing how often I post animal photos on my Instagram, I thought to myself, why am I drawn to them and what do they all have in common?  I discerned that they were mostly comedic and took on some form of personification.  As humans, it's pretty fun to see ourselves in other creatures.  So I made a conscious effort to paint animals versus humans and insert a bit of my own humor.

In the past I have worked primarily on large scale pieces.  This time around, I decided to restrict myself to an 8x10 format, which offers up it's own challenges and rewards. Large scale paintings just have that immediate impact, the size alone draws in viewers. Yet working with the 8x10's I have found they feel more intimate, and I can be as bold with color as I please.

Overall, my work has underlying narrative qualities, but only snippets. I want to know where this monkey is going, and why is he lost in the city? Hopefully they viewer will finish the story for his or herself.  That's the fun part. Or at the very least be amused.

How did you get started? I've always been an artist, since I could hold a crayon I suppose.  I've been one of the lucky ones, with a family that encouraged and supported me from childhood to adulthood to pursue the arts.

What are your goals for the future? Stay motivated.

Natalie Kent The Sage

Natalie Kent

What is your medium/process? I work in a variety of mediums ranging from graphite pencil, pen and ink, or Prismacolor pencil to large acrylic paintings. Lately I've enjoyed focusing on small drawings and illustrations.

Where are you from? Houston, Texas, living and working in Edmond.

How would you describe your latest body of work? This latest body of my work relies heavily on symbolism and dream imagery. I enjoyed creating these pieces with a lot of unanswered questions so that- like dreams- the meaning may vary from viewer to viewer. I think one of the most powerful elements in art is the power of interpretation. Good art doesn't just give you the answer, it lets you find it on your own.

What inspires you? Dreams, metaphors, Renaissance & Surrealist art, and nature. I'd say 99% of my work usually falls in one of those categories. I bring my sketchbook everywhere I go and it's filled with notes of last night's dreams, doodles, urban sketches, ideas for future paintings... we live in an amazing world full of the most fascinating things. It's hard not to be inspired.

How did you get started? I began creating art when I was very young. Some kids would sell lemonade in the neighborhood and I would sell art for 5 cents, setting up shop on a little table at the end of my driveway and busting out one-of-a-kind Picasso-esque Crayola marker pieces. My parents were very supportive of my interest in art and enrolled me in oil painting and watercolor classes throughout middle school and high school.

What are your goals for the future? My goals for the near future are to transition into developing larger paintings. Working on a large scale is out of my comfort zone and honestly a bit intimidating for me, but as an artist I think it's imperative to challenge yourself and push your limits on a semi-regular basis to improve yourself. There's no growth in the comfort zone.

As far as long-term goals, I plan on continuing to create art and show my work in Oklahoma City.

jeff sparks july 13th

jeff sparks

jeff sparks: july 13th

Jeff Sparks is talented local illustrator/artist whose art we first saw in 2008 at the Canvas shoe art show. Since then we searched with no luck and spent many long nights wondering where he hides his works. We were ecstatic when we saw a shirt he illustrated for Warpaint a couple years ago and then shortly after when he approached us for a show. Needless to say he doesn't show very often so come get a rare peek at his dark and masterful illustration skills. This is a perfect show for a Friday the 13th.

We will also have the music of Cari Wallenberg out front once it cools down a bit in the evening.

jeff sparks

jeff sparks