Ruth Borum Loveland

ruth borum loveland

july 9th // ruth (borum) loveland

With summer in full swing DNA Galleries is happy to announce our latest art exhibition featuring Norman based artist Ruth (Borum) Loveland. As long time fans and close friends, we have had the great opportunity to see Ruth's work progress and evolve over the last decade. Her newest series "demonstrates a slow accumulation of discoveries" which can be appreciated in the various media, use of color and meticulous detail-oriented subject matter. As each piece holds a level of personal meaning to the artist, she truly hopes that the viewer can interpret the works to find their sense of meaning.

Read more about the artist below.

Be sure to join us Thursday July 9th from 6-9pm for the Artist Preview Reception the evening preceding our regularly scheduled 2nd Friday Opening the following night during Live On The Plaza.

RSVP to the Facebook Event here.

Artist Preview Reception: July 9th 6pm-9pm LIVE On The Plaza Opening: July 10th 7pm-11pm Exhibit Runs July 9th – August 7th

ruth borum loveland

Artist Questions // Ruth (Borum) Loveland

Where are you from?
 I am from Oklahoma City

How did you get started?
 I made a conscious shift in the way that I used my free time when I was like... 15. I've been painting regularly ever since.

What inspires you?
 I am inspired by art materials, wood grain, being outdoors, mushrooms, things my son says, things I feel, things I know to be true.

What is your medium/process? I consider all my work as mixed media. It is a combination of pen drawings, photocopied manipulations of pen drawings, transfers of those manipulations, wood-burnings, sanded layers of paint, and acrylic paint applications. I work in a series, so I usually begin a piece where another one left off and the outcome Is always unplanned.

How would you describe your latest body of work? My latest body of work demonstrates a slow accumulation of discoveries. It's centered around the process I have developed around taking an original drawing and manipulating it on a copy machine. When enlarging images, I stay pure to the photocopier, and never scan or digitally alter an image. The stretching that occurs in some of the forms is a movement on the glass of the copier, thus making each output truly original and impacted by the touch of a hand. I love the surprise of taking a drawing and altering it with movement on the copy machine. My recent body of work explores bringing these techniques together, taking me further in my image making journey. My husband went through an intensive course of cancer treatment last year and I find that everything I do now is a meditation of gratitude, community, love, relationships, and repeating, altering, and multiplying the good in our lives. While some of the work carries personal meaning, my greatest wish is that it can be open to the the viewer for their personal interpretation. Each painting can be appreciated for the basic material aspects of color, shape, size, and level of detail. I keep a certain level of feeling and understanding hidden just below the surface of the formal aspects of the work as to allow it to be hung in any space and be an object of interest and consideration.

What advice do you have for other artists? Work on something everyday. Even if it seems inconvenient. Habit is more dependable than inspiration or talent.

What are your goals for the future? Since having my son, I have had to completely rewire my ways of working and am just now gathering my steam back up. I ended up in a full time job, that is really great but includes a commute, so I have to work double hard to carve out time to work in the studio. My goal is to transition back into full time art making through gallery representation and direct work with folks to make art for their homes. I just bought a potters wheel and a tiny kiln so a big goal is to get a regular ceramics practice going. I also want to do more west coast traveling with my husband and son in the future. We go out into the woods around Oklahoma a lot and I want to continue to do more of that.

ruth borum loveland